Do you garden? Wish you could have beautiful flowers all year round? Well, aside from advising that you move someplace with less snow, I can give you my top five flower types that bloom late in the season. Along with each type, I’ll add some tidbits of information for your horticulture pleasure! Without futher ado, I give you…

Goldenrod

These hardy plants can grow up to four feet tall.

Wrinkle Leaf Goldenrod

A beautiful plant native to North America, goldenrod’s cheery yellow golden flowers welcome the season with bravado. An added bonus? This flower actually is not typically a source of allergies, so plant without fear! Scientific name: soldiago rugosa.

Fall Crocus

All three subspecies originate in Turkey.

Fall Crocus

I’m sure you’re familiar with crocuses in springtime, but don’t overlook the Fall types! Also called Bieberstein’s crocus, these little beauties are perfect for both sun and shade. Scientific name: crocus speciosus.

Toad Lily

Just look at this intricate, orchid-like flower! (Image courtesy of Amy Stafford.)

Toad Lily

Go big or go home, right?! Though their name isn’t much to write home about, toad lilies will add a snazzy pop to your end-of-season garden. These easy-care perennials bloom from late summer to mid-Autumn. Scientific name: tricyrtis hirta.

Leadwort

Native to temperate and tropical regions of Africa and Asia.

Leadwort

Also called plumbago, leadwort is a great ground cover that thrives in both sun and shade. But beware: in sun, it has a tendency to spread pretty fast! This plant puts on not one but two Autumn shows: first, electric-blue blossoms take the stage, followed by leaves that turn lovely shades of red. Scientific name: ceratostigma plumbaginoides.

Sweet Autumn Clematis

Wonderfully fragrant blooms attract pollinating bees.

Sweet Autumn Clematis

A native of the buttercup family, this fast-growing vine can grow to be 20 feet tall! Before you plant it, however, make sure to check that it isn’t still considered an invasive plant in your area. Scientific name: clematis terniflora.

 

Native Americans’ Day

October 1, 2014

Happy Native Americans' Day!

Happy Native Americans’ Day!

Though not a national holiday, Native Americans’ Day is observed in Autumn in a growing number of states in the Union. It is celebrated in either late September (the fourth Friday in September) or in mid-October as a replacement for what is widely known as Columbus Day. In California, where I live, it’s been observed in late September since 1968. If you live in California, click here to learn more about this statewide celebration and day of learning.

A dancer performs in traditional dress.

A dancer performs in traditional dress.

In South Dakota, 1990 was proclaimed “The Year of Reconciliation” between Native Americans and white people. It’s debatable how much the two peoples actually reconciled, but one of the outcomes of the year was that Columbus Day (observed in the United States on the second Monday in October) was changed to Native Americans’ Day to remember and respect the First Nations of the area, the Sioux/Lakota.

Cultural and historic heritage is an important part of all American traditions.

Cultural and historic heritage is an important part of all American traditions.

At the Crazy Horse Memorial in South Dakota,  for example, the “Native Americans’ Day celebration… each year includes naming the Crazy Horse Memorial Educator of the Year, honoring an individual who has made significant contributions to Native American education at the primary or secondary school level… The holiday’s program includes a free public program featuring Native American singers and dancers. Programs and displays featuring artists, storytellers, and hands-on activities for children are [also] offered… and a free buffalo stew lunch is available for all visitors.” (To learn more about the Native American Lakota man named Crazy Horse, click here.)

The juxtaposition between tradition and modernity is sometimes striking.

The juxtaposition between tradition and modernity is sometimes striking. (via Mike Ghouse)

A similar holiday, Native American Heritage Day, is celebrated on the day after Thanksgiving in the United States. Since this day’s inception, it has expanded into Native American Heritage Month in November each year. (Also check out the Bureau of Indian Affairs information.)

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